Saints Stars & Selfies

February 21 - April 2

Overview

Liane Lang, "Fellow Travelers", 2012, digital pigment print, Courtesy of the artist
Mark Newport, "The Scout", 2005, archival ink-jet on paper, Courtesy of Ted G. Decker
Nina Katchadourian, Lavatory Self-Portrait in the Flemish Style #6, 2010, digital photograph, Courtesy of the artist and Catharine Clark Gallery
"Saints Stars & Selfies" installation view
Hendrik Kerstens, from left to right, "Spout", 2011 ultrachrome print, Courtesy of Byron Cohen Gallery and "Cosy", 2012 ultrachrome print, Courtesy of Mark and Gaye Cohen
Kathleen Gilje American, born 1945 Hercules & Omphale, Restored, 2001 oil on canvas, Courtesy of Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita State University, Foundation Art Collection, Museum Purchase by exchange of the Gift of Ernest Trova

 

"Saints Stars & Selfies" features recent work by a selection of artists who are inspired by art history and reference historical works of art by Fra Angelico, Frederick Remington, Hans Holbein, Francisco Goya, Carl Andre and genres and styles that include Renaissance painting, American modernism, Dutch portraiture, and Social Realism.

The artists in the exhibition are quoting or referencing or reinterpret-ing particular works, often in a way that creates a convergence between contemporary popular culture and art history. The exhibition is curated by Raechell Smith.

 
Pariticipating artists include Juan Capistran, Kathleen Gilje, Nina Katchadourian, Hendrik Kerstens, Liane Lang, Vik Muniz, Mark Newport ('86 fiber), Jaimie Warren ('02 printmaking) and Kehinde Wiley. 

Checklist

Saints Stars & Selfies
Exhibition Checklist

Juan Capistran
Born Mexico, 1976; lives in Los Angeles
Hand Catching Led, 2007
video
3 min. 3 sec.
Courtesy of the artist

Juan Capistran
Born Mexico, 1976; lives in Los Angeles
The Breaks, 2002
giclée photoprint
40 3/4 x 40 3/4 inches
Courtesy of the Kadist 101 Collection

Juan Capistran
Born Mexico, 1976; lives in Los Angeles
We Are Family, 2001
fabric over panel
60 x 60 x 3 inches
Courtesy of the artist

Kathleen Gilje
American, born 1945
Hercules & Omphale, Restored, 2001
oil on canvas
35 1/2 x 20 1/2 inches
Courtesy of Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita State
University,  Foundation Art Collection, Museum
Purchase by exchange of the Gift of Ernest Trova

Nina Katchadourian
American, born 1968
Lavatory Self-Portrait in the Flemish Style #2,  2010
c-print
16 1/2 x 13 3/8 inches
Courtesy of the artist and Catharine Clark Gallery

Nina Katchadourian
American, born 1968
Lavatory Self-Portrait in the Flemish Style #5,  2010
c-print
17 1/4 x 13 1/4 inches
Courtesy of the artist and Catharine Clark Gallery

Nina Katchadourian
American, born 1968
Lavatory Self-Portrait in the Flemish Style #6,  2010
c-print
16 1/2 x 12 7/8 inches
Courtesy of the artist and Catharine Clark Gallery

Nina Katchadourian
American, born 1968
Lavatory Self-Portrait in the Flemish Style #12,  2010
c-print
15 5/8 x 13 5/8 inches
Courtesy of the artist and Catharine Clark Gallery

Hendrik Kerstens
Born the Netherlands, 1956; lives in Amsterdam
Spout, 2011
ultrachrome print
39 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches
Courtesy of Byron Cohen Gallery

Hendrik Kerstens
Born the Netherlands, 1956; lives in Amsterdam
Cosy, 2012
ultrachrome print
40 x 30 inches
Courtesy of Mark and Gaye Cohen

Liane Lang
Fellow Travelers, 2012
Born Germany, 1973; lives in London
digital pigment print
39 x 48 inches
Courtesy of the artist

Liane Lang
Born Germany, 1973; lives in London
Grand Gestures, 2010
Lambda print
55 3/4 x 45 inches
Courtesy of the artist

Liane Lang
Born Germany, 1973; lives in London
Poster Boy, 2012
digital pigment print
39  x 48 inches
Courtesy of the artist

Vik Muniz
Born Brazil, 1961; works in New York
and Rio de Janiero
Jorge, 2003
photogravure on silk collé
52 1/4 x 41 1/2 inches
Courtesy of John and Sharon Hoffman

Mark Newport
American, born 1964
The Scout, 2005
archival ink jet print, edition of 5
24 x 36 inches
Courtesy of Ted G. Decker

Mark Newport
American, born 1964
The Kid, 2006
archival ink jet print, edition of 8
13 x 19 inches
Courtesy of the artist

Mark Newport
American, born 1964
Sunset, 2006
archival ink jet print, edition of 8
19 x 13 inches
Courtesy of the artist

Mark Newport
American, born 1964
Spiritman #2, 2013
hand-knit acrylic and buttons
80 x 23 x 6 inches
Courtesy of the artist

Jaimie Warren
American, born 1980
Self-portrait as Bulls Fan in La Jeunesse de Bacchus
by William-Adolphe Bouguereau (Michael Jordan
Basketball Painting by dosysod of the Independents), 2012
digital print on vinyl
8 x 14 feet
Courtesy of the artist

Jaimie Warren
American, born 1980
Self-portrait as Yoda in L’admiration by William-Adopphe Bouguereau (Yoda Borguereau by Mandrak), 2013
c-print
30 x 40 inches
Courtesy of the artist

Jaimie Warren
American, born 1980
Self-portrait as Woman in Les Demoiselles d’Avignon by Pablo Picasso (Online Deceptions by MommaBird), 2012
c-print
40 x 30 inches
Courtesy of the artist

Jaimie Warren
American, born 1980
That’s What Friends Are For: Self-portrait as Christ (Missy Elliot in a Re-creation of Fra Angelico’s Predella for the High Altarpiece of San Domenico, Fiesole), 2013
5-channel video
4 min. 15 sec.
Courtesy of the artist

Credits:
In collaboration with Cindi Warren and Sally Andersen
Hair and Makeup lead by Lee Heinemann
Costumes by Lindsey Griffith, Lee Heinemann, Sara Haug, Erin Zona, Matt Roche and Jaimie Warren
Props and styling lead by Jaimie Warren
Lighting by Kevin Schowengerdt and Zach Van Benthusen
Music by Matt Roche
Made in Kansas City, MO, summer 2013

Special thanks to:
Allison Sandoval, Nathan Henry, Johanna Brooks, Casey Dobbins, Ari Fish, Marie Dougherty, Cydney Ross, Rochelle Brickner-Owings, Brandon Nemeth, Jordan Hauser, Lisa Kettlewell, Amy Gross, Raechell Smith, Malory Ward, Harper Page, Rachel Helm, Brett Patrick Livingston, Emma Penrose, Kiki Serna, Jackie Brandle, Sara Nelson-Murphy, Erica
Peterson, Andrea Peterson, Daniel Goggin, Garrett Fuselier and Jessy Abid

Kehinde Wiley
American, born 1977
St. Adrian, 2006
oil on canvas
8 x 6 feet
Courtesy of John and Sharon Hoffman

Essay

Trembling Allusion: Context Out of Context
Annie Fischer
Trembling Allusion: Context Out of Context
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
"Human TK" redirects here. For non-human entities that take on the appearance of being human, see human disguise (disambiguation).
 
Allusion is an economical device. Quotations are used for a variety of reasons: to illuminate the meaning or support the arguments of the work being quoted; to provide direct information about the work being quoted (whether to discuss it positively or negatively); to pay homage to the original work or author; to make the user of the quotation seem well-read; and/or to comply with copyright law.Allusion can draw upon the ready stock of ideas, cultural memes, or emotion already associated with a topic in a shorter space. In an allusion to “the city that never sleeps,” New York will be recognized. Recognizing the figure in this condensed puzzle-disguise serves to reinforce cultural solidarity between the maker of the remark and the hearer: their shared familiarity with the Big Apple bonds them. If they can do this in an open and comfortable way, they can become quite intimate in an intellectual area. Hyperlinks can be bidirectional: they can be followed in two directions, so both ends act as anchors and as targets. More complex arrangements exist. As each row progresses, a new loop is pulled through an existing loop. The active stitches are held on a needle until another loop can be passed through them. Allusion moves in one direction. It is not possible to predetermine the nature of all the new meanings and intertexual patterns that an allusion will generate. Adagio – slow and stately (literally, “at ease”): Fra Angelico was born Guido di Pietro at Rupecanina in the Tuscan area of Mugello, near Fiesole, toward the end of the 14th century. Nothing is known of his parents. He was baptized Guido or Guidolino. All of his many paintings were of divine subjects, and it seems that he never altered or retouched them, perhaps from a religious conviction that, because his paintings were divinely inspired, they should retain their original form. In November 2006, two missing masterpieces by Fra Angelico turned up, having hung in the spare room of the late Jean Preston, in her “modest terrace house” in Oxford, England. The paintings’ previous owners had consulted Preston in the 1960s in her capacity as an expert medievalist. Preston recognized them as being high-quality Florentine renaissance, but it never occurred to anyone, even all the dealers she approached on behalf of the owner, that they could possibly be by Fra Angelico. There was almost no demand at all for medieval art at the time and no dealers showed any interest, so Preston’s father bought them almost as an afterthought, along with some manuscripts. The manuscripts turned out to be high-quality Victorian forgeries by the Spanish Forger, the name given to an unidentified individual who, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, created a large number of forgeries of medieval miniatures. The Spanish Forger’s works were painted on vellum or parchment leaves of genuine medieval books, using either blank margins or scraping off the original writing. His works fooled many experts and collectors and are today themselves collected, selling for several thousand dollars each. Although he was originally thought to be Spanish, it is now believed he may have been French. One of the main disparities between humans and animals is that humans have a much higher capacity for imitation. A 2009 study found that babies mimic their parents’ pitch contour. French infants wail on a rising note. The Germans favor a falling melody. If someone’s chasing you down the street with a knife you just run, you don’t turn around and shout, “Give it up! I was a track star for Mineola Prep.” Chasing comes from the French word chasser, meaning to drive out, which is what the artists are doing as they “chase” the forms on their metal in order to create their final design. An example from antiquity is the late Eighteenth Dynasty mummy mask of Tutankhamun. The lapis lazuli and other stones were inlaid in chased areas after the height of the form was completed. Sets of precious substances may form hierarchies that express conventional perceived relative value or merit. The measurement of sales of popular music starts high relative to the wedding anniversary scale, concentrating on gold and platinum. Credit card companies usually have a “gold card” and a “platinum card.” Standard Chartered Bank has introduced a “titanium card” as a grade higher than platinum. It is a sardonic comment on the tendency to put excessive trust in “computerized” data, and on the propensity for individuals to blindly accept what the computer says. The person having ordinary skill in the art (often abbreviated PHOSITA in the United States) is a legal fiction found in many patent laws throughout the world. This fictional person is considered to have the normal skills and knowledge in a particular technical field, without being a genius. If it would have been obvious for this fictional person to come up with the invention while starting from the prior art, then the particular invention is considered not patentable. The man on the Clapham omnibus is a hypothetical reasonable person, used by the courts in English law where it is necessary to decide whether a party has acted as a reasonable person would. In Australia, the “Clapham omnibus” expression has inspired New South Wales and Victorian equivalents. In Hong Kong, the equivalent expression is “the man on the Shaukiwan Tram.” The reasonable person standard is by no means democratic in its scope; it is, contrary to popular conception, intentionally distinct from that of the “average person,” who is not necessarily guaranteed to always be reasonable. For non-human entities that take on the appearance of being human, see human disguise. An average person is generally seven-and-a-half heads tall (including the head). This can be illustrated to students in the classroom using paper plates to visually demonstrate the length of their bodies. An ideal figure, used for an impression of nobility or grace, is drawn at eight heads tall. A heroic figure used in the depiction of gods and superheroes is eight-and-a-half heads tall. Most of the additional length comes from a bigger chest and longer legs. The everyman character is constructed so that the audience can imagine itself in the same situation without having to possess knowledge, skills, or abilities that transcend human potential. A space selfie is a selfie that is taken in space. Today, a “Cassandra” refers to someone who predicts disasters or negative results, especially someone whose predictions are disregarded. Today, when someone is said to be experiencing his or her “15 minutes of fame,” the allusion is to Andy Warhol’s famous remark. Russian Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna at age 13 was one of the first teenagers to take her own picture, using a mirror, to send to a friend in 1914. In the letter that accompanied the photograph, she wrote, “I took this picture of myself looking at the mirror. It was very hard as my hands were trembling.”

Events

February 7 Fri
February 22 Sat
March 26 Wed

Press

Selected Press

Artspace Plays With the Past
The Kansas City Star |
Sun, 2014-03-23

Historical masterworks inspire contemporary commentary in 'Saints, Stars & Selfies.'